Tag Archives: best accounting books







Benefits and detractors of credit risk

Inroduction

The objective of this research is to examine the control of credit risk threat in financial institutions. Credit risk control in financial institutions starts with the organization of sound lending principles and an efficient structure for handling threats (Jorion, 1997). Guidelines, industry-specific requirements and recommendations, together with risk focus boundaries are designed under the guidance of risk control committees and departments (Bluhm, Overbeck & Wagner, 2016).

Credit risk, also known as counterparty threat is the possibility of loss due to a debtor’s non-repayment of a loan or other history of credits (either the principal or interest (coupon) or even both). Also, credit risk threat is most simply defined as the potential that a financial loan client or counterparty won’t succeed to meet their responsibilities with respect to agreed terms.

In most financial institutions, financial loans are the biggest and most obvious source of credit rating threat. However, other sources of credit risk exist throughout other sections and products of a bank. They consist of actions in the financial and trading books, and those both on and off the balance sheet. Banks are progressively experiencing credit risk threat or counterparty threat in various financial instruments they offer other than financial loans. These consist of bankers’ acceptances, interbank dealings, trade financing, forex trading dealings, economical futures trading, trades, ties, stocks, options and the agreement of transactions.

Credit risk research (finance risk research, loan default rate analysis) and credit risk control are important to banks which provide economical loans to businesses and individuals. Credit risk can occur for various reasons: bank mortgages (or home loans), automobile purchase economical situation, credit card buys, installment purchases, and so on. Credit loans and trading facilities are situations that have the danger of leading to losses due to defaults. To know the danger level of credit users, credit providers normally collect large amount of information on debtors. Mathematical techniques can be used to analyze or determine threat stages involved in credits, economic situations, and economical loans, thus standard threat stages. While banks have faced prolems over the years for a multitude of factors, the major cause of serious banking problems continues to be proportional to lax credit standards for debtors and counterparties, poor portfolio threat control, lack of attention to changes in economic factors (interest prices, inflation prices, etc.)

In modern times, the flow of credit in global marketplaces has slowed from a glacial pace to a virtual standstill and credit marketplaces threaten to stay that way despite immense amounts of cash being pumped into various economies by their government authorities and central banks around the world. Credit risk is a problem faced by economical institutions all over the entire world and the question mostly asked is “what will it take for financial institutions to regain enough confidence in the economic climate to get credit score marketplaces moving again?”

Derivatives

Both policymakers and writers have placed significant fault for the Panic of 2008 – the international economic trouble that achieved full strength in that year – on over-the-counter (“OTC”) derivatives (Gerding, 2009). In turn, legal and policy reactions to the problems, such as the Dodd-Frank Act, have presented many new limitations on these particular economical equipments. Among other things, the Dodd-Frank Act prevents future government relief of certain organizations that trade in derivatives, requires the main cleaning of many derivatives, and allows government authorities to set new security specifications for types that are excused from those main cleaning specifications (Gerding, 2009).

Yet, a research of both the role of types in the economic problems and the new rules regulating derivatives, must avoid artwork with too wide concepts. Several misunderstandings endanger to mix up both the most serious threats resulting from derivatives and the regulating reaction. A certain varieties of derivatives – especially credit score types – cause particular concerns because of their ability to increase make use of throughout the economic system. Credit derivatives  are a form of mixture, whose value is based on the money risk of another firm or economical instrument (Omarova, 2009) . However, the full economic consequences of the higher make use of from credit score types are often themselves not fully fleshed out. Many commentators have focused on how improved make use of, whether arising from credit score types or otherwise, magnifies the frailty of banking organizations. To be sure, excessively utilized banking organizations represent an important concern.

==> Click here to learn about Outsourcing and migrating from GAAP to IFRS

Moreover, by linking one standard bank to another, credit score derivatives can increase counterparty threat, or the threat of one party to economical transaction defaulting on its obligations. The web created by banking organizations entering into complex credit score derivatives with one another in series raises the specter of utilized organizations falling like dominoes (Huang & Huang, 2012). The potential incidents of failing banks and other economical firms represents one form of system threat. It was this scenario that apparently animated the extraordinary federal bailout of the insurance giant AIG, which had underwritten hundreds of billions of dollars in credit score derivatives that proved assures to other large banking organizations. The emerging failure of the firm left a myriad of other banking organizations with enormous exposure (Posner, 2009).

Yet this potential domino effect of counterparty risk is but one side of the coin of the consequences of credit score derivatives and their ability to lead to leverage. What the above research, however briefly summarized, fails to capture are the macroeconomic results of credit score derivatives. Writers need to aim to move beyond the research into the counterparty risk of derivatives to explore these macroeconomic results. By allowing banking organizations – those organizations that borrow to lend – to enhance make use of, credit score derivatives can operate to boost the overall amount of assets in markets. This increase in assets can be thought of as helping the overall supply of money in a market, which can have a number of significant economic effects (Posner, 2009). By improving leverage and assets, credit score derivatives can fuel rises in resource costs and even bubbles. Rising resource costs can then mask mistakes in pricing credit score derivatives and in assessing the risk of make use of in the economical state. Furthermore, the use of credit score derivatives by banking institutions can contribute to a cycle of leveraging and deleveraging in the economy.

Advantages of credit risk

Many types of credit rating threats exist, which sometimes are known as in specific terminology. Any improvement in costs associated with a client not paying as decided can be loosely classified as credit rating threat. For example, even if credit cards customer does end up not paying his bill, if the lender has to make selection calls or resort to a selection agency, this increment on price is a version of credit risk. More specifically, “default risk” is the danger that the celebration does not and cannot pay as decided (over and above a simple increment in selection cost) and is sometimes generally known as “counter-party threat.” When the client is a government, credit rating threat is often generally known as “sovereign threat.”

Companies, government authorities and all types of lenders take part in credit ranking research to determine to what level they face credit ranking risk associated with their investment strategies. In with a weight of the pros and cons for making a certain type of investment, firms utilize in-house applications to recommend on reducing and preventing threat (or shifting it elsewhere) or use third party help, like analyzing ranking agencies’ estimates of credit reliability from companies like Standard & Poor’s, Moody’s, Fitch Scores and others. After banks using their models and the advice of others to position customers according to the threat, they apply this knowledge to reduce credit ranking threat.

Creditors use a variety of means to lessen and control credit score threat. One way lenders decrease credit score threat is by using “risk-based pricing,” in which lenders charge higher rates to debtors with more perceived credit score threat. Another way is with “agreements,” whereby lenders apply stipulations to credit, such as debtors must periodically report on their finances, or such that debtors must repay the financing in full after certain events (like changes in the customer’s debt-to-equity ratio or other financial debt ratios). Another method is diversification, which can decrease credit score threat to lenders as well as a diversified client pool is less likely to standard simultaneously, leaving the creditor without hope of recovery. Besides these, many companies utilize credit score insurance or credit score derivatives, such as “credit standard swaps,” in an attempt to transfer threat to other companies.

==> Top 5 of The Best Accounting and Finance Textbooks That Everyone Must Read

Conclusion

In this report we have been able to define credit risk that is faced by financial institutions. These are threats whereby the bank clients can either default in the financial obligations to the bank or the bank having to incur additional costs so as to recover from the client. Credit derivatives have also been looked at. Their effect on interest rates has also been expounded on. Credit risk has also its own advantages. Financial institutions that embrace it and put in place strict strategies to contain it will be prosperous.

References

Bluhm, C., Overbeck, L., & Wagner, C. (2016). Introduction to credit risk modeling. Crc Press.

Gerding, E. F. (2009). Deregulation pas de deux: Dual regulatory classes of financial institutions and the path to financial crisis in Sweden and the United States. NEXUS, 15, 135.

 

Huang, J. Z., & Huang, M. (2012). How much of the corporate-treasury yield spread is due to credit risk?. Review of Asset Pricing Studies, 2(2), 153-202.

 

Jorion, P. (1997). Value at risk (pp. 1-4). McGraw-Hill, New York

 

Omarova, S. T. (2009). The Quiet Metamorphosis: How Derivatives Changed the’Business of Banking’. University Miami Law Review, 63, 1041.

Posner, R. A. (2009). A failure of capitalism: The crisis of’08 and the descent into depression. Harvard University Press

READ MORE

Performance Management system

Growth and development analysis of a human being

It has been written previously that one is born with their traits. Writers have also indicated that traits are passed from one generation to another. I however believe this to be untrue. There are those traits that one is born with and those that one learns as they grow up.

We cannot take for granted the interactions one has with other human beings and nature. This has a way of changing us. The way we think and believe is highly contributed by the people we interact with and our backgrounds. In this paper we will discuss how I grew up to procrastinate and also a perfectionist. I believe I grew into this.

I push myself and others to do a perfect task and at the same time do the hard tasks the last minute.

Procrastination is evading the performance of a job which needs to be achieved. It is doing the more enjoyable tasks first, or doing those tasks that are less urgent as a substitute to more vital ones. This means that one puts off the difficult tasks first. Everyone has been accused of procrastinating at one point or another. However, more than 20 % of the population is said to procrastinate frequently. Procrastination can be defined as their way of life.

Performance management his highly done, in line with the goals and objectives of the organisation while at the same time ensuring that the strengths and weaknesses of employees have been established.  Meeting business goals and objectives is the essential reason for there being any organisation.

For this to be achieved there needs to be periodical measurements of the progress towards achieving these goals and objectives. The goals and objectives of the organisation need to have been communicated to all employees so that the company can soldier on as one team.  After this communication has been done, the achievement of these objectives needs to be measured appraised and relevant actions taken from time to time. The performance management process is part of the entire business since its inception till the day that it closes business.

Procrastination is said to reflect our struggle with self-discipline and control. It also shows our inability to predict our feelings for the next day. To critic this statement and belief I would say that procrastinators are good at making choices and prefer lesser demanding tasks as compared to the difficult tasks. Critics can also be quoted saying that procrastinators claim that they achieve better results when under pressure. More often than not that’s the way procrastinators qualify tasks and then work towards achieving them.

Personally, I have in many occasions preferred to avoid negative emotions so as to delay stressful tasks. So as to achieve more with limited I prefer doing the difficult tasks under pressure. This has enabled me to save time over the years.

Psychologists have cited such abehavior as a way of dealing with anxiety that is associated with finishing a task. Anxiety can get you to start working on a task either early or late (Steel, 2010). The focus should therefore be more of impulsiveness. Anxiety can only cause you to late on a task if it is impulsive.

 

 

 

==> Accounting Issues Raised After Financial Analysis

References

Steel, P. (2010). The procrastination equation: How to stop putting things off and start getting stuff done. Random House Canada.

 

READ MORE

Company evaluation

Mission and Vision Evaluation

Remember to search for a mission and vision statement then evaluate them (running the mission statement through the mission-statement components.  If you cannot find either or both, so note in this report section, and write one for the company.

This part Includes a:

  • Vision Statement
  • Mission Statement
  • List Mission Statement Evaluation Components that are satisfied
  • Rationale for the components included as well as excluded.

==>Top 5 of The Best Accounting and Finance Textbooks

Milestones

Begin with a concise company profile followed by 5-10 company milestones.  Synthesize the company’s uniqueness and identity.  For example, a fun, employee-centered culture or low-cost, no-frills strategy uniquely identifies Southwest Airlines.

External Assessment

Insert your completed EFE Matrix.  Discuss the high score factors and interpret the overall score for your reader.

Your final paper will include:

·         An External Factor Evaluation (EFE) Matrix .

 

o    Why is this environmental factor key?

o    Why does the factor carry this much weight?

o    Why you rated the factor as you did?

·         How should management interpret the total weighted score?

How to do an External Assessment

After reading the case, first scan the environment. Use the following steps:

1.    List key external factors (opportunities and threats). These factors apply to all firms in the industry, not just this company. Any firm could potentially take advantage of an opportunity or be challenged by a threat because these factors are in the external environment. Include a total of 10-20 factors. Be as specific as possible.

2.    Assign a weight to each factor that ranges from 0.0 (not important) to 1.0 (very important). The weight indicates the relative importance of that factor to being successful in the industry. The sum the weights of all factors (for both opportunities and threats combined) must equal 1.0.

3.    This is the step at which the company (revlon) enters the picture. Assign a rating between 1 and 4 to each factor to indicate how effectively the firm’s current strategies respond to the factor, where 4=the response is superior, 3=the response is above average,2=the response is average, and 1=the response is poor. Ratings are based on effectiveness of the firm’s (revlon.) strategies. Ratings are company-based, whereas the weights in Step 2 are industry-based. Both threats and opportunities can receive a 1, 2, 3, or 4.

4.    Multiply each factor’s weight by its rating to determine a weighted score.

5.    Sum the weighted scores for each variable to determine the total weighted score for the organization(Revlon)

Internal Assessment

Insert your completed IFE Matrix.  Discuss the high score factors and interpret the overall score for your reader.  Use financial ratios for internal factors too, if applicable. (For example, if the company has a low inventory turnover ratio, this could be a weakness in the IFE Matrix.) See the link below under “Appendix” to help you preliminarily examine the financial ratios.

==> Read on the advantages of debt

SWOT Analysis

Summarize the key strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats.  Also, consider how well your company is managing both environments. This section serves as a conclusion to Case 1. Simply summarize the key strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats that were prominent in your EFE and IFE matrices. This is not a SWOT Matrix, which is a matching technique. Matching techniques (e.g., the SWOT Matrix) are part of Case 2. 

 

 

READ MORE

Accounting Issues Raised After Financial Analysis

Dear Sir/Madam,

RE: Accounting Issues –  Year Ending 30th June 2016.

This is in reply to your email sent on 18th April 2016 in regard to accounting issues we had previously discussed over the phone. Below is our feedback on all the issues that you had raised:

  1. In regards to the issue of the court decision to reward damages to your client held on 26th March 2016 we would advise that you set aside funds amounting to $1 million in your general reserves account for use upon the verdict expected on 30th September 2016. Below are the journal entries to record this transaction. The same also needs to reflect on the statement of financial position.
ITEM DR CR
PROFIT and LOSS A/C 1,000,000
GENERAL RESERVE 1,000,000

==> Top 5 of The Best Accounting and Finance Textbooks

  1. In the case of Ipad sales we would advise that you treat the sales as debtors less the discounted amount. This is to reflect in the financial reports. You also said that the total amount owed is $ 250,000. This is to treated as accounts receivables less the discounted amount. Below are the journal entries to be recorded in your books.
ITEM  DR  CR
Account receivables            232,500.00
Discount allowed               17,500.00
Stock        250,000.00
TOTAL            250,000.00        250,000.00

 

Plant A/c
 ITEM  DR  CR
 Cash      76,000.00
 Accumulated depreciation      25,000.00
 Plant      85,000.00
 Gain on sale of plant      16,000.00
   101,000.00    101,000.00

 

Your adjusted statements are as below.

 

A statement of cash flow is prepared to show cash flow from operation and cash flow activities. This report shows changes in financial positions leading from operational activities, investing activities and financial activities. This information can then be used by an analyst to make a conclusion.



A statement of cash flow also assists in making cash forecasts. This is then used in internal management to determine management policies especially those touching in finances. The report is also credited for resulting in cash planning.

Through the preparation of cash flow statements, a business can compare the performance of projects. By comparing the actual cash flows against expected cash flow, a business can know how the project is fairing. An income statement measures a company`s performance financially eg by expenses, revenue, profits or losses over a specified period of time. This therefore means that both financial reports have their importance.

 

References

AASB, A. S. (2004). Financial Instruments: Disclosure and Presentation.Disclosure51, 52.

 

Bushman, R. M., & Smith, A. J. (2001). Financial accounting information and corporate governance. Journal of accounting and Economics32(1), 237-333.

 

Lev, B., & Zarowin, P. (1999). The Boundaries of Financial Reporting and How to Extend Them (Digest Summary). Journal of Accounting research,37(2), 353-385.

 

Yours Faithfully

 

 

READ MORE

Producer and Consumer Surplus with Price Floors

 

Suppose that the Gondwanaland Chairman of Production who sets the governmental price floor for gosum berries in an effort to assist the gosum berry producers to have a higher income, set the price floor at $70 per barrel. These berries are a food staple of the Gondwanalandians and contributes directly to their health and long life (average lifespan of 150+ active years).

In that particular year the amount of gosum berries produced at the $70 price floor was 700 barrels per month. To support the price of gosum berries, the Chairman of Production’s Office had to purchase 400 barrels per month.  The accompanying diagram shows supply and demand curves illustrating the market for Gondwanaland gosum berries.

 

  1. In the absence of a price floor, the maximum price that a few of the consumers are willing to pay up to $100 per barrel of gosum berries. The market equilibrium (E) price is $50 per barrel. How much consumer surplus is created, when there is no price floor? Show your calculations.

Consumer surplus is defined as the area below the demand curve but above the market price(Sun, Delucchi, Lin & Ogden,  2014) In our case the consumer surplus is represented by the area between price of $50 and $100 against quantity of 500.

Consumer surplus        = ½ (50*500)

= 50,000

==>  Top 5 Accounting Textbooks to Improve your skills

 

  1. How much producer surplus when there is no price floor?

Producer surplus is the area below the price curve but above the supply curve. (Sun, Delucchi, Lin & Ogden, 2014)

Producer surplus         = ½ (50*500)

=50,000

  1. What is the total surplus when there is no price floor? Show your calculations.

 

Total surplus    = 50,000 +50,000

= 100,000

 

  1. d) After the price floor is instituted, the legal minimum price that can be charged by suppliers is $70 per barrel. The maximum price that a few of the consumers are still willing to pay is $100 per barrel of gosum berries. With the price floor at $70 per barrel, consumers buy 300 barrels of gosum berries per month. How much consumer surplus is created with the price floor?

Consumer surplus after the price floor            = ½ (30*300)

= 4,500

How much producer surplus is created with the price floor? Show your calculations.

Producer surplus after price floor       = ½ (70*700)

= 24,500

  1. e) The Chairman of Production’s Office buys any barrels of gosum berries that the producers are not able to sell. With the price floor, the producers sell 300 barrels per month to consumers, but the producers, at this high price floor, produce 700 barrels per month. How much money does the Chairman of Production’s Office spend on buying up surplus gosum berries? Show your calculations.

= 700 barrels  – 300 barrels

= 400 barrels

= 400*70

= 28,000

 

  1. f) The Emperor of Gondwanaland must collect taxes from the people to pay for the purchases of surplus gosum berries by the Chairman of Production’s Office. As a result, total surplus (producer plus consumer) is reduced by the amount the Chairman of Production’s Office spent on buying surplus gosum berries. Using your answers for parts d, e, and f, what is the total surplus when there is a price floor? Show your calculations.

Total surplus    = 24500 + 4500

= 29000

  1. g) How does this compare to the total surplus without a price floor from part c?

The price floor has reduced the total surplus in the market.

 

References

Sun, Y., Delucchi, M. A., Lin, C. Y. C., & Ogden, J. M. (2014). The producer surplus associated with gasoline fuel use in the United States. Working paper, University of California at Davis.

READ MORE